EPC

Energy Performance Certificate

EPC - Energy Performance Certificate

What is an EPC?

An EPC (Energy Performance Certificate) provides an Asset Rating for the building on a scale of A to G. This energy efficiency rating is based upon the heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, controls, building envelope, and any on-site energy generation (such as solar photovoltaic panels). This data is assessed against the activities within the building, such as office, workshop, restaurant etc. Up Energy has experienced in-house level 4 energy assessors able to undertake EPCs on all kinds of non-domestic buildings including hotels, restaurants, offices, industrial units, schools, supermarkets and retail shops as well as newly constructed houses.

When is an EPC required?

An EPC is required by law when a building is constructed, marketed, sold or let. The certificate is valid for ten years unless significant changes are made to the building and/or HVAC system. Accompanying all our EPCs is a recommendations report, which provides recommendations on improving the energy performance of the building and is divided up into payback periods.

EPC for Solar PV

Up Energy regularly undertake EPCs for buildings looking to claim the Feed-in Tariff or FiT for a solar panel or wind installation. As experienced level 4 Energy Assessors we will use our in-house knowledge to provide feedback on whether a property can obtain a ā€˜Dā€™ rating for the full tarrif, the most cost effective way, or even how much PV could be needed.

If you are a renewable energy installer and would like some more information about achieving a D rating, please see our guide.

EPC Exemptions

In a few instances an EPC is not required for some buildings such as listed buildings, places of worship and buildings to be demolished under planning consent. However, for solar PV installers it is important to note the standard exemptions for producing an EPC for sale or let do not necessarily apply to the Ofem guidance for FiTs. As experienced EPC assessors Up Energy is able to identify when a building for a Feed-in Tariff application requires an EPC or an EPC exemption letter. The guidance from Ofgem is not clear cut, so do call us and we will provide you all the advice we can. We have also created a useful guide to point you in the right direction.

EPC for Part L

If your EPC is for Part L Building Regulations please see our SBEM page.


ABBE Accredited

ABBE Accredited

STROMA Accredited

STROMA Accredited

REGENSW Member

REGENSW Member